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Business Courses

Achieving Career Excellence (ACE)

The Achieving Career Excellence program is designed to help students prepare for their chosen career. Completion of the ACE program is a graduation requirement for all traditional aged business students.  The driving philosophy of the mandatory program focuses on building a sense of community among business majors while educating them about the various career directions open to them in the diverse field of business.

During the college years, students will grow socially, academically and professionally.  The ACE program focuses specifically on professional development and preparation for the world of work. All four years, students will be asked to participate in a series of workshops and activities designed to help them investigate career opportunities and prepare them to obtain meaningful employment after graduation.  Each year focuses on a specific set of developmentally appropriate activities designed to move students closer to their ultimate goals. These activities include career development programs, service opportunities, and cultural events.

ACE 101: Career Discovery and Exploration (0) and ACE 102: Career Discovery and Exploration (0)
Self-Assessment and Awareness. Provides an introduction to business careers and ethics. Student's will identify their skills, interests and values and how they relate to careers and work environments.

ACE 201: Career Tools II(0) and ACE 202: Career Tools (0)
Preparing for Business Life. Focuses on career and market exploration, job search skills, resume design and writing, business practices and cooperative education opportunities.

ACE 301: Career Experiences (0) and ACE 302:Career Experiences (0)
Planning your Career Search. Centers on job search resources and professional associations, interviewing and networking. Required for all business juniors.

ACE 401: Career Reflection and Planning (0) and ACE 402: Career Reflection and Planning (0)
Beginning your Career. Explores job placement opportunities, evaluating a job offer professional associations and assessment of career plans.

Business Course Descriptions

ACCT 191: Accounting Foundations (1)
This course should be taken by non-business majors, with a finance minor. 
This course covers basic concepts underlying published financial statements, including the balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement. Focus is on understanding statements rather than preparation. Cannot earn credit for this course along with ACCT 210.

ACCT 210: Financial Accounting(3)
Co-requisite: placement in MATH 131
Offered every semester. Core business class. Accounting majors are encouraged to take this class freshman year. All other business majors should take this core class no later than sophomore year.

Financial accounting is an introduction to accounting principles and concepts, measurement of business income and determination of financial position. Emphasis is on the theory and practice of accounting cycle leading to the preparation of financial statements for sole proprietorship and the theory of asset, liability and owner equity accounts. Emphasis is on understanding financial information for decision-making purposes.

ACCT 211: Managerial Accounting (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 210 and MGMT 250
Offered every semester. Core business class. Accounting majors are encouraged to take this class freshman year. All other business majors should take this core class no later than sophomore year.

Managerial accounting is a study of the concepts, nature, objectives and reporting flows of managerial accounting. Emphasis is placed on how accounting information is used by decision makers within the context of the overall managerial function. Topics include cost accumulation for product costing; cost structure for control and motivation; cost volume profit relationships; profit planning; standard costing and relevant costs for non-routine decisions. Specific analytical techniques will be discussed, including activity-based costing and cost volume profit decisions.

ACCT 220: Business Law I (3) 
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. This course is required for accounting majors and should be completed by sophomore year.  All other business students may opt to take this class or MGMT 223 to fulfill this core requirement.
Business Law is the study of the fundamental concepts, principles and rules of laws that apply to business transactions. Primary attention is given to contract law and the Uniform Commercial Code as it relates to sales and commercial paper. Each area will be discussed and analyzed through the use of cases and problems.

ACCT 301: Intermediate Accounting I (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 211
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be completed fall sophomore/junior year.
Intermediate Accounting I begins the development of accounting theory, practice, research and analysis covering the accounting cycle, and current assets. Topics covered include cash, receivables, short-term investments, and inventory valuations. IFRS coverage is integrated into course.

ACCT 302: Intermediate Accounting II (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 301
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement.  Should be completed spring sophomore/junior year.

Intermediate Accounting II continues the development of accounting theory practice, research and analysis from the perspective of a financial accountant. Emphasis is placed on long-term assets, current and long-term liabilities, and stockholders' equity. This course should be taken immediately after ACCT 301. 

ACCT 303: Intermediate Accounting III (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 302
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be completed fall junior/senior year.
Intermediate Accounting III continues the development of accounting theory, practice, research and analysis from the perspective of the financial accountant. Emphasis is placed on earnings per share, and certain long-term liabilities, including pensions, deferred taxes and leases. The cash-flow statement, revenue recognition, and accounting changes and error analysis will be studied in depth. This course should be taken immediately after ACCT 302.

ACCT 311: Individual Income Tax (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 250, ACCT 211 and 45 hours
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be completed by end of junior year.
Individual Income Tax is an introduction to the theory and broad outline of federal income tax law as it applies to the individual taxpayers, including income recognition and expense deduction rules, property transactions, tax credits and current law changes, along with limited coverage of the impact of federal law on Illinois Income Tax reporting.

ACCT 321: Cost Accounting (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 250, ACCT 211
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. This course should be completed by end of junior year.

Cost Accounting is a detailed study of accounting systems for managerial planning and control, the use of their outputs, and their effect on the organization. Coverage includes cost-volume-profit analysis, costing systems, standard costing, capital budgeting and relevant cost analysis. Students will be exposed to emerging issues in the field. Emphasis will be placed on the ability to analyze information and situations and make decisions that drive the business.

ACCT 331: Accounting Information Systems (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 302
Offered every Summer. Accounting elective. Should be completed fall junior/senior year.
This course is a study of the concepts, nature, and objectives of accounting information systems. AIS integrates the students' knowledge of accounting with computer technology, management concerns, and quantitative reasoning. Internal controls will be addressed. Students will be introduced to  Sage50 (Peachtree) Accounting Software. This software is compatible with WINDOWS only.  Advanced EXCEL techniques will be reviewed.

ACCT 341: Auditing (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 303
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be taken junior/senior year.

This course should be taken junior or senior year. Auditing allows students to gain an understanding and familiarization of financial statement auditing, and other value-added assurance and attestation services. Topics covered include auditing theory and legal and ethical issues related to auditing, creating an auditing plan, analyzing audit risk, studying and assessing internal control, performing statistical samplings, gathering audit evidence and preparing audit reports. Current issues in auditing will also be discussed.

ACCT 351: Advanced Accounting Issues (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 303
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be taken junior/senior year.
Advanced Accounting is the study of the concepts, nature objectives and reporting issues related to not-for-profit/governmental organizations, partnerships, and foreign currency transactions.  The equity method will be expanded to include consolidation theory and practices.

ACCT 361: Corporate Income Tax (3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 311
Offered every semester. Accounting requirement. Should be taken junior/senior year.
Corporate Income Tax provides students with a review of tax theory, introduction to tax research and tax planning as it relates to federal and multi-state income taxation applied to corporations and S-corporations. Students' will gain an understanding of the annual tax compliance cycle of the typical corporate tax department including preparation of the annual tax provision, sales and use taxes, real and personal property taxes, payroll taxes, annual reports, and unclaimed property returns. Discussion will be held regarding how various taxes interact and/or conflict with one another.

ACCT 381: Accounting Internship (3)
Prerequisite: 60 hours and consent
Offered every semester. Accounting elective. Fulfills community-based learning requirement. 

Under the tutelage of a cooperating organization, the student studies the management of an administrative or staff function and submits projects. Internship may not include any of the duties of a currently held position. Students' receiving credit must have the pre-approval of the program director and will work directly with the program director. Approval will be based on the level of technical work actually being done during the internship. Additional readings and research will supplement their work experience. Grade is based on job performance and academic projects related to the position.

ACCT 391: Directed Readings (1-3)
Offered by arrangement with faculty member. Permission required.
With the consent of an instructor, assistant dean, and the dean of the Graham School, the student completes a prescribed set of readings in a selected area and submits a report or takes an examination. 

ACCT 399: Selected Topics in Accounting (1-6)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent
The focus of this course varies but takes the format of a seminar on a subject of current interest. Subjects include current topics in a selected area of business. 

ECON 191: Economic Principles (1)
This course should be taken by non-business majors, with a finance minor. 
This course reviews basic economic principles with a focus on macroeconomics. Issues include aggregate supply and demand, monetary and fiscal policy, consumption, investment, unemployment, inflation and economic growth.  You cannot earn credit for this course and ECON 200.

ECON 192: Statistical Foundations (1) 
This course should be taken by non-business majors, with a finance minor.
This course provides a review of basic statistics focusing on descriptive statistics with an introduction to basic concepts underlying statistical inference. You cannot earn credit for this course and MATH 132. 

ECON 200: Principles of Economics (Macro) (3)
Offered every semester. Core business class. Should be taken freshman year.
This course provides an understanding of the principles of economic analysis with emphasis on how to utilize these principles. Students will learn to build valid opinions about the fundamental economic problems that every society has to deal with. They will learn that economics offers a systematic way of thinking and useful analytical tools for successful managing of many of society's economic problems. Topics include the principles of underlying the operation of a national economy as a whole, analysis of gross domestic product accounts, national income determination, levels of employment (or unemployment) and inflation, taxation and government expenditures, monetary and fiscal policy and the basics of international trade. 

ECON 201: Principles of Economics (Micro) (3)
Offered every semester. Core business class. Should be taken freshman year.
The study of the principles of microeconomics deals with the operation of the market economy. This course emphasizes the understanding of the theory of demand and supply, the cost of production, and market structure. Topics include the operation of a market, the performance of business firms under different types of markets, price determination and profit maximization strategies under various types of market structures ranging from perfect competition to monopoly. The basics of international trade are also covered. 

ENGL 354: Business and Professional Writing (3)
Offered every semester. 
See course description in the English section of this catalog

FINC 300: Principles of Finance(3)
Prerequisite: ACCT 210 and 45 hours
Offered every semester/Fast-Track fall II. Core business class. 

This course should be completed junior year. Finance is an introduction to corporate finance and the techniques used by financial managers. Topics include an overview of the financial environment, analysis of financial statements, consideration of risk and return on investment, the time value of money, valuation models of stocks and bonds, the cost of capital and capital budgeting, the capital structure and dividend policy of firms, and an overview of capital markets and the investment banking process. 

FINC 310: Money and Banking (3)
Prerequisite: FINC 300
Offered every semester. Finance major requirement, upper division business elective all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year.

Money and Banking is designed to help students understand the operations of financial institutions and financial markets and the crucial role they play in modern economies. This course focuses on four broad areas that include the importance of studying money and banking and an overview of the financial system, understanding the interest rate and its importance in market economies, the importance of money and monetary policy and the role of the Federal Reserve System and issues related to financial institutions. 

FINC 320: Investments and Portfolio Analysis (3)
Prerequisite: FINC 300
Offered every semester. Finance major requirement, upper division business elective all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year.

Investment and Portfolio Analysis focuses on the theories and techniques basic to control of investment risks and optimization of investment returns. Student's study the investment setting and asset allocation, the organization and functioning of securities markets, efficiency of capital markets, asset pricing models, security valuation, investment companies, and the futures and options markets. 

FINC 330: International Finance(3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 340 and FINC 300
Offered every semester. Finance major requirement, upper division business elective all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year.

International Finance is an intensive study of the issues related to the international financial environment and the tools used by management of multinational corporations to make decisions involving foreign investments and financing. Core areas studied include foreign exchange markets, parity conditions and currency forecasting and multinational capital budgeting. 

FINC 340: Advanced Corporate Finance (3)
Prerequisite: FINC 300
Offered every semester. Finance major requirement, upper division business elective all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year
In Advanced Corporate Finance, students study cases involving companies and managers facing a wide variety of financial and managerial issues and problems. Topics include planning for current and long-run financial needs, merger analysis, and dividend policies, choosing the optimal capital structure, raising funds in both domestic and foreign capital markets and risk management in an international setting.

FINC 350: Futures and Options (3)
Prerequisite: FINC 300
Offered every semester. Finance major requirement, upper division business elective all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year.

This course will conduct intensive study of theories and practices of options, futures and swaps as used in business world. The use of these derivatives instruments to manage the risk in real market environments as well as enhance return will be discussed through problem solving and short cases. 

FINC 381: Finance Internship (3)
Prerequisite: 60 hours and consent
Offered every semester. Fulfills community-based learning requirement. 

Under the tutelage of a cooperating organization, the student studies the management of an administrative or staff function and submits projects. Internship may not include any of the duties of a currently held position. Students' receiving credit must have the preapproval of the program director and will work directly with the program director. Approval will be based on the level of technical work actually being done during the internship. Additional readings and research will supplement their work experience. Grade is based on job performance and academic projects related to the position. 

FINC 391 Directed Readings (1-3)
Prerequisite: Consent and permission
Offered by arrangement.

With the consent of an instructor, assistant dean, and the dean of the Graham School, the student completes a prescribed set of readings in a selected area and submits a report or takes an examination.

FINC 399: Selected Topics (1-6)
Prerequisite: Consent and permission
Offered by arrangement.

The focus of this course varies but takes the format of a seminar on a subject of current interest. Subjects include current topics in a selected area of business.

MGMT 223: The Legal Environment of Business (3)
Offered every semester. Fast-Track fall II. Core business class Should be completed by end of sophomore year.
The Legal Environment of Business is the study of the history and development of the judicial system and the creation of the various administrative agencies that affect the legal environment of business. Principles of labor-management, consumer, and antitrust and environmental law are discussed and analyzed through the use of cases and problems. Special emphasis is placed upon the impact of administrative law in the world of business.

MGMT 250: Computer Applications in Business (3)
Offered every semester. Core business class. Should be completed by end of freshman year.
Introduction to the main spreadsheet application in Microsoft Office 2010. The use of Excel's basic and advanced features to achieve business objectives will be discussed, demonstrated, and applied. Students will learn worksheet skills that will satisfy upper level business course prerequisites and assist in solving business problems. 

MGMT 300: Principles of Management (3)
Prerequisite: 45 hours
Offered every semester/fast-track spring I.
This course introduces important organizational and management concepts and applications, and their relevance to individual and organizational goal attainment. The course revolves around the main functions of managers: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. The emphasis will be on real world application through experiential learning. The objective of the course is consistent with Graham School of Management’s statement of purpose, that is, to highlight the social, technological, competitive and ethical challenges of providing responsible leadership and effective management in a diverse and changing global society. 

MGMT 310: Introduction to Hospitality Management (3)
Prerequisite:MGMT 300
Offered every spring. Hospitality requirement, management elective, upper division business elective for all other majors.

Introduction to Hospitality Management is designed to provide an overview of the hospitality industry including all of its related fields, restaurant, lodging, meetings and conventions. Student's are provided with a broad exposure to one of the largest and fastest-growing industries. Student's will leave the course with an understanding of the career opportunities available in the industry, a realization of the challenges faced by professionals in the industry, have a knowledge of the current operating procedures and understand the functions of management in the hospitality and tourism industry. 

MGMT 320: Operations Production Management (3)
Prerequisite: MATH 132 and 45 hours
Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring I Core business class. Should be completed by end of junior year.

This course should be taken junior or senior year. Operations Management is the study of the management of the direct resources required to produce the goods and/or services provided by an organization. The course focuses on competitiveness, with emphasis placed on the close coordination of business unit operational decision making and strategic planning. Topics covered include product/process design, aggregate planning, operations scheduling, inventory theory, and quality control and incorporates the use of quantitative techniques for operational decision making. Attention is given to the strategic uses of advanced manufacturing systems such as FMS, MRP and JIT. Comparisons of Western and Japanese management and manufacturing philosophies are also studied. 

MGMT 330: Diversity in Organizations (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 300  
Offered every fall. Management elective, upper division business elective all other majors. Fulfills three hours of the diversity Gen Ed requirement. Should be taken junior/senior year. HR elective.
This course addresses various aspects of diversity. The focus of the course is to help you develop an ability to understand, respect, and value diversity; and through readings, discussions, and assignments explore application and implication to management activities. Issues related to discrimination, affirmative action, career development, socialization and social change policies are explored; historical, psychological, sociological, legal and managerial viewpoints are highlighted.

MGMT 340: International Business (3)
Prerequisite: ECON 200 or ECON 201 and 45 hours
Offered every semester/Fast-Track fall II. Core business class. Should be completed by end of junior year.

This course should be completed by junior year. International Business is a survey course designed to provide a basic understanding of the various facets of international business. Starting with the concept of globalization and basic trade theories, the course will cover trade practices, the mechanics of the foreign exchange market, international finance and accounting, marketing cultural differences and management strategy under the international environment, organizational structure of multinational companies and other international institutions. 

MGMT 360: Human Resource Management (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 300
Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring II. Required for HR majors  Management elective, upper division business elective for all other majors.

Human Resource Management is the study of principles and methods of general personnel management. Topics include staffing, evaluation, training and development, as well as compensation within the framework of organizational, governmental and societal goals and restrictions. 

MGMT 362: Negotiations and Conflict Resolution (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 300
Offered every fall  Required for HR majors. Management elective, upper division business elective for all other majors.
This is an introductory course to the study of negotiation and conflict resolution. Some degree of conflict is inevitable in one's life and the ability to manage it is integral to one's effectiveness as a person and as a potential leader. On some level, much of all that individuals, groups and organizations do to be successful is negotiated, therefore, an understanding and practice of negotiation is an important prerequisite for each of us. This class is intended to be useful to all students, not just to those whose jobs require formal negotiations. In the course, students will gain insight into various approaches, the strengths and weakness associated with each, when to use
which, and those that work best for each person. The course draws heavily on simulations, case studies, and class discussions.

MGMT 370: Organizational Behavior (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 300
Offered every semester/Fast-Track fall I. Management majors requirement, upper division business elective for all other majors.
This course is required for management majors. The class material will include theory, research, and practical application of Organizational Behavior (OB) in organizations.  OB is the study of how individuals, groups, and workplace contexts impact behavior within an organization. The goal of OB is to understand, predict, and influence employee attitudes and behavior in order to improve organizational effectiveness.  Topics include personality differences, work motivation, leadership, influence processes, and group dynamics. 

MGMT 373: Introduction to Training and Workplace Learning (3)
Prerequisite: MGMT 300
Offered every semester. Management and HR elective.
Regardless of the industry, promoting and managing learning in an organization is a critical function. This course provides an introduction to adult learning, learning preferences, motivation, coaching, workplace instruction and organizational learning structures. Students will identify workplace learning needs and design appropriate training or other workplace learning opportunities. Group discussions will be used to relate learning theories to practical solutions. Group projects will be used to build students' skills in identifying needs, developing strategies,and designing workplace learning opportunities, and evaluating outcomes.

MGMT 380: Business, Ethics and Society (3)
Prerequisite: 60 hours
Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring I. Required core class. Satisfies University IDS requirement.  Should be taken junior/senior year.
Students will develop an understanding of the interrelationship and interaction of society, business and government at the national and international level.  Students will learn to develop the ability to recognize the importance of ethics in business and society, what ramifications can occur and what solutions can be developed to resolve conflicts that arise.  The class will focus on allowing students to develop and understanding of ethical concepts, philosophical principles, terms and processes relating to business.  They develop the analytical, written and oral communication skills needed in business. 

MGMT 381: Business Internship (3)
Prerequisite: 60 hours and consent
Offered every semester.

Under the tutelage of a cooperating organization, the student studies the management of an administrative or staff function and submits projects. Internship may not include any of the duties of a currently held position. Student's receiving credit must have the preapproval of the program director and will work directly with the program director. Approval will be based on the level of technical work actually being done during the internship. Additional readings and research will supplement their work experience. Grade is based on job performance and academic projects related to the position. 

MGMT 390: Business Strategy (3)
Prerequisite:ACCT 210, ACCT 211, MGMT 200, MGMT, 320, MGMT 340, MKTG 300, FINC 300
Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring II. Capstone core business class. Take senior year.

This is the capstone business course and should be taken senior year. This course is concerned with the development of skill in identifying and analyzing opportunities and solving problems in business situations. Students will be required to apply knowledge, techniques and skills learned in core business courses. Topics include evaluating environmental changes important to a particular business, business analysis, identifying and applying generic business strategies such as Porter's five forces. 

MGMT 391 Directed Readings (1-3)
Offered by arrangement.
With the consent of an instructor, assistant dean, and the dean of the Graham School, the student completes a prescribed set of readings in a selected area and submits a report or takes an examination.

MGMT 399: Selected Topics (1-6)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent
Offered by arrangement.
The focus of this course varies but takes the format of a seminar on a subject of current interest. Subjects include current topics in a selected area of business.

MKTG 300: Principles of  Marketing (3)
Prerequisite: BUS 200 or BUS 201 and 45 hours
Offered every semester/Fast-Track fall I Core business class. Should be completed by the end of junior year.

This course should be completed by junior year. Marketing provides a basic foundation of marketing principles, introduces the students to a full understanding of marketing practices pertinent today and stresses the importance of traditional marketing issues. The course will provide practical, marketing application exercises through which students apply newly learned marketing concepts in realistic situations. Topics covered will include ethics, issues in the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion, and distribution of ideas, goods and services. 

MKTG 310: Hospitality Marketing (3)
Prerequisite:MKTG 300
Offered every fall This course is required for hospitality majors,upper division business elective for all other majors.

Hospitality Marketing discusses the major decisions hospitality marketing managers face in their efforts to balance objectives and resources against needs and opportunities in today's global marketplace. The main objective when marketing any product is to make your product attractive to potential customers and/or a particular market. In hospitality specifically, marketing refers to the process of how a restaurant, hotel, travel business or resort can sell itself in a competitive marketplace.

MKTG 311: Achieving Service Excellence (3)
Prerequisite:MKTG 300
Offered every spring. This course is required for hospitality majors, upper division business elective for all other majors.

Achieving Service Excellence is designed to provide students with opportunity to integrate their acquired knowledge of the industry through experience and coursework with understanding of the service dilemma organizations face. Students will learn how managing operations, human resources, finance and technology along with controlling costs can impact the delivery of service excellence and organizational performance. Through the use of case studies, students will examine different strategies for delivering service. Topics covered include measures of success in service organizations, customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, talent management, employee empowerment and involvement, managing costs and resources, creating value, knowing the competition and technology. 

MKTG 340: Consumer Behavior (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 300 Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring I. Marketing elective (Internet and Social Media elective), upper division business elective for all other majors. Should be taken junior/senior year.
Consumer Behavior focuses on the most important asset of any business the customer. The consumer and the specifics of how and why consumers behave as they do is the subject of the course. Knowledge of the buying process and the factors influencing behavior help design the best marketing strategy and the mix of product, price, promotion and physical distribution to satisfy the needs and wants of consumers. 

MKTG 350: Internet Marketing (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 300
Offered every fall. Marketing elective (required for Internet and Social Media Marketing), upper division business elective all other majors. Take junior/senior year
The course will provide an overview of e-buiness strategies, electronic marketing strategies and the
integration of Internet-based business and marketing communications strategies with traditional methods of
going to market and communications with customers and suppliers. Further, we will review the evolving world
of social media and consumer-created content.

MKTG 355: Social Media Marketing (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 300
This course will introduce students to the contexts and forms of social media, including what are social media, who uses them, who gains from them, and how are they transforming the media landscape.  Students will become familiar with a range of social media tools, analyze and discuss their uses and implications. The purpose of this class is to ensure that students are familiar with a range of social media tools , including the ability to use them for practical applications, and to encourage analysis and critical thinking with regard to the role of social media in professional, social, and cultural contexts.

MKTG 360: Promotional Strategy (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 300
Offered every semester/Fast-Track spring II. Marketing elective, upper division business elective all other majors. Take junior/senior year.
Promotional Strategy is the study of the strategy and management of promotion practices. Students will explore techniques for planning, implementing, controlling and evaluating advertising and sales promotion activities. Topics covered include analysis of social, economic and legal aspects of advertising, determination of promotional objectives, selection of campaign themes, media planning and testing, copy preparation and production. A promotional plan will be developed. 

MKTG 380: Marketing Strategy (3)
Prerequisite: MKTG 300
Offered every semester/Fast-Track fall II. Required for all marketing majors, upper division business elective for all other majors. Should be completed junior/senior year.

Marketing Strategy is designed to help students understand and analyze the strategic planning process as it relates to marketing concepts and principles. Students will learn how to critically analyze the task of marketing under contemporary conditions within a firm, industry and society. Emphasis is placed on identifying and analyzing area of the marketing mix and how they relate to the strategic goal and objectives of an organization, identifying major marketing problems, and evaluating marketing decisions/strategies as they relate to the strategic plan of an organization. 

MKTG 381 Business Internship (3)
Prerequisite: 60 hours and consent
Offered every semester. Fulfills community-based learning requirement. 
Under the tutelage of a cooperating organization, the student studies the management of an administrative or staff function and submits projects. Internship may not include any of the duties of a currently held position. Student's receiving credit must have the pre-approval of the program director and will work directly with the program director. Approval will be based on the level of technical work actually being done during the internship. Additional readings and research will supplement their work experience. Grade is based on job performance and academic projects related to the position.

MKTG 391: Directed Readings (1-3)
Offered by arrangement.
With the consent of an instructor, assistant dean, and the dean of the Graham School, the student completes a prescribed set of readings in a selected area and submits a report or takes an examination.

MKTG 399: Selected Topics (1-6)
Prerequisite: Instructor consent
Offered by arrangement.
The focus of this course varies but takes the format of a seminar on a subject of current interest. Subjects include current topics in a selected area of business.

( ) = credit hours / / = classroom hours

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