Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice Courses

Sociology

SOC 101: Introduction to Sociology (3)

*Offered fall and spring semesters
This course is a multiculturally oriented introduction to the study of society looks at our social organization and belief systems, exploring how we both are shaped by them and change them. The dynamics of social agreements and conflicts are also examined, along with the consequences of inclusion and exclusion for people.

SOC 140: Sociology of Sports (3)

*Offered annually
The fascination with sports on the part of American people is the focus of this course. Topics include competitive and self-competitive sports, professional and amateur sports and pseudo-sports. Analysis of the mystique of sports and the nature of winning is undertaken.

SOC 210: Sociology of the Family (3)

*Offered fall and spring semesters
The meaning and experience of family varies across time, different cultures and different places. Sociology of the Family examines how this ancient institution continually adapts to social pressures and how its different incarnations help individuals adapt to a changing world. The class emphasizes important factors such as social class, race and ethnicity, gender and sexual orientation and how these relate to different experiences in family relationships, gender roles, marriage/partnership and domestic conflict.

SOC 214: Language, Culture and Society (3)

*Cross Ref: ANTH 214
*Offered annually
This course is an introduction to major anthropological and sociolinguistic concepts that explain both uniformity and diversity in language behavior. One focus is on the origin, development and variation of the world's languages. The general focus is on language diversity in North American English in terms of differences based on nation, region, ethnicity, class, gender, age, lifestyle and social context.

SOC 215: Medical Sociology (3)

This course analyzes the emergence of the health system in this country, including its interrelationships with the political, social and economic systems. Focus will be on the sociological definitions of health and sickness; the social roles of patients, physicians, nurses and other health care professionals; and the ideologies that define, shape and control the health care system.

SOC 220: Social Deviance (3)

In the nature of coexisting, groups engage in defining normative behavior by examining the behavior and choices of individuals they come to construct as deviant. In this course, we will examine the formation of deviant groups and lifestyles, the role played by alcohol and drugs in producing deviance, as well as the societal functions of deviant behavior. Topics may range from serial killers to corporate deviance, from sexual to homicidal deviance.

SOC 221: Social Problems (3)

In this course the distinction between social conditions and social problems is examined, along with a consideration of selected contemporary social issues. The relationships among social problems, social organization, norms, role processes and social control are also explored.

SOC 224: Invention of Race (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies AND Latino/Latin American Studies programs
This course explores the origin of the concept of race from a folk ideology in late 17th-century North America. It traces the evolution of this concept into a worldview that currently functions as the most fundamental way of understanding human variation. 

SOC 225: Racial and Ethnic Relations (3)  

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies AND Latino/Latin American Studies programs
In this course the sociological factors in racial and ethnic relations are examined. Consideration is given to the nature of institutional racism. The dynamics of prejudice and discrimination are analyzed.

SOC 235: Sex, Culture and Society (3)   

*Cross Ref: ANTH 235
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
This course examines the sexual legacies of our primate heritage. Human sexuality and gender roles are explored cross-culturally in their social, political and ideological contexts.

SOC 243: Chicago Neighborhoods (3)

Chicago, as has often been stated, is a city of neighborhoods. This course is designed to provide a sociological understanding of the complex urban mosaic created by Chicago's rich and diverse neighborhood communities. Special attention will be paid to the social forces that shaped the city, as well as to the ethnic enclaves, voluntary associations, cultural institutions and historical sites that continue to enrich this vibrant metropolis.

SOC 275: Women, Change and Society (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
This course examines how gender is socially constructed across time and across cultures. We will explore how gender impacts the lives and choices of women and men in settings such as the family, career, politics, the law and religion.

SOC 280: Sociology of Education (3)

This course covers the social origins of the American educational system; educational reform movements; the social organization of schools; power and status in the schools; teacher professionalization; student culture and the "student role"; the "hidden curriculum" of schools; social inequalities and the school system; the effects of race, class and gender on education; and the future of American schools. Because of the close relationship between schools and their social environment, we will also trace the influence of social, political, economic and religious institutions on the goals, values and methods of American schools.

SOC 283: Gangs and Society (3)

*Cross Ref: CJ 283
*Offered annually
In this course the social roots of street gangs in modern society are explored, along with their growth, recruitment and organization. The relationships of gangs to each other, to crime and violence, to the law, and to the community and schools are also explored.

SOC 285: Special Topics in Sociology (3)

The subject matter of this course will vary, depending on student interest and faculty resources. Examples of courses that might be included are popular culture, sociology of literature and sociology of religion.

SOC 290: Death, Dying and Suicide (3)

This course focuses on death, dying and suicide which are examined socially, psychologically, religiously, politically and economically both in the United States and cross-culturally.

SOC 294: Statistics and Research Design I (3)

*Cross Ref: CJ 294
*Prerequisite: Either MATH 105, MATH 200, or other approved college-level math placement and 3 credit hours in sociology, anthropology or criminal justice
*Offered annually, every fall
This course examines the fundamental principles and tools of social science research. Students will develop a basic literacy that enables them to understand and evaluate the merits and limits of various research strategies and tools of analysis, including social science statistics.

SOC 295: Statistics and Research Design II (3)

*Cross Ref: CJ 295
*Prerequisite: SOC/CJ 294
*Offered annually, every spring
This course examines social science problem solving through the use of various research tools, methods and research designs. This portion of the sequence will incorporate learning with hands-on practice.

SOC 300: Social Theory (3)

*Prerequisite: SOC 101 and one other 3 credit hour course in sociology or anthropology
*Offered annually
This course examines the basic concepts of classical and contemporary sociological theory.

SOC 309: Gender and Globalization (3)  

*Cross Ref: ANTH 309 
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
This course examines the economic, socio-political and cultural aspects of globalization within the framework of contemporary debates about gender. The main focus will be on how globalization affects gender roles, ideology and the experiences of men and women in transnational contexts. Our own discussion of the meaning of globalization will address questions about the novel character of globalization, shifts in labor and production practices and the contested relevance of the nation-state. 

SOC 310: Mind, Self and Society (3)

*Prerequisite: SOC 101 and one other 3 credit hour course in sociology or anthropology
*Offered annually
This course examines the social origins of the individual's self or identity; the relationship between individuals and society; the social construction of reality and individual consciousness; the social presentation of self in every-day society; and the ways individuals try to shape how others perceive them.

SOC 318: Sociology of Aging (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in sociology or anthropology
This course explores the sociological aspects and theories of aging. Using a cross-cultural perspective, the content focuses on issues in life-course, leisure and retirement, social ecology and structure, interpersonal and intergenerational relations, and the economics and politics of aging.

SOC 325: Race, Class, Gender and Justice (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
This course introduces students to the complex and subtle ways social inequality is produced and reproduced in and through U.S. law and social practices. We examine race, class, sex and gender hierarchies as interrelated systems and consider how an individual's multiple statuses (race, class, gender, sexuality) combine to produce sets of privileges and constraints. 

SOC 327: Sociology of Childhood (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in sociology or anthropology
An examination of socializing agents, structural constraints and support by fundamental American institutions as they affect child development. Legal, commercial, religious, familial and political institutions are explored for their effects on the development of the young child.

SOC 345: Jurisprudence and Gender (3)

*Cross Ref: CJ 345
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
The Rule of Law is meant to establish a system of rules founded on principles rather than personalities. In this course we examine a system that is gendered, built on the story of men's lives. Our analysis takes us through at least three major strains of legal argument that begin with different assumptions and lead to different policy outcomes but all of which are guided by a notion of gender equality.

SOC 360: Social Class (3)

This course focuses on social classes. The theories, systems and consequences of how societies differentiate and rank both individuals and groups. Emphasis is placed on understanding the class structure of the United States along with the related concepts of power, authority, prestige, inequality and mobility.

SOC 366: Senior Seminar and Project (3)

*Prerequisite: SOC 300 
*This course is open to sociology majors ONLY
*Offered every spring
This course focuses on the pursuit of a major topic in sociology or in the function of sociology in society. Students will conduct an original research project.

SOC 367: Research Practicum (3-6)

*Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in sociology or anthropology, junior standing and consent of instructor
This is a course by special arrangement, designed to provide advanced sociology/anthropology students with an intensive research experience under the supervision of an individual professor. Topics, times and places will vary. 

SOC 370: Special Topics in Sociology (1-6)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in sociology or anthropology
The subject matter of this course will vary, depending upon faculty and student interest and faculty resources. Examples of courses that might be included are homelessness, social movements and collective behavior and sociology of professions.

SOC 390: Independent Study (1-3)

*Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in sociology, junior standing and consent of department chair and instructor
*Offered by special arrangement
Students who have done exceptionally well may take this course to pursue a topic of their own choosing. The student's eligibility, general topic, specific selection of readings and the format (e.g., a research paper, tutorial, short summary essays) will be worked out with the instructor.

Anthropology

ANTH 101: Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3)

*Offered annually
In this course the human ways of life, with their diverse adaptations, organizational processes, social practices and belief systems are surveyed. How various peoples confront the dynamics of change in the contemporary world are also explored.

ANTH 105: Archaeology (3)

*Offered annually
Archaeology is one of the four subdisciplines of anthropology and it focuses on the study of past human behavior through studying the material culture left behind. This course will examine the history of archaeological investigation, different theoretical approaches in archaeology, the nature of the archaeological record, archaeological survey and excavation, archaeological classification and analysis, dating techniques, artifact analysis, conservation and storage of artifacts.

ANTH 120: Physical Anthropology (3)

This introductory course is designed to provide students with an understanding of human evolution and diversity from a physical anthropological perspective. Major topics include the concept of evolution, biological relationships between humans and other primates, the fossil record of human evolution, and the basic methods employed by archaeologists and physical anthropologists in the study of prehistoric humans' biological and cultural development.

ANTH 214: Language, Culture and Society (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 214
*Offered annually
This course is an introduction to major anthropological and sociolinguistic concepts that explain both uniformity and diversity in language behavior. The origin, development and variation of the world's languages. Focus on language diversity in North American English in terms of differences based on nation, region, ethnicity, class, gender, age, lifestyle and social context.

ANTH 235: Sex, Culture and Society (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 235
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies Program
In this course the sexual legacies of our primate heritage are examined. Human sexuality and gender roles are explored cross-culturally in their social, political and ideological contexts. 

ANTH 243: Myth and Mythology (3)

This course serves as an interdisciplinary, cross-cultural examination of both descriptive and theoretical research on myth from the ancients to the present, in order to foster appreciation of the universal, general and particular dimensions of expressive culture. Special consideration is given to the significance of myth as a continuing source of spiritual and artistic inspiration.

ANTH 245: Third World in a Global Context (3)

This course focuses on Third World issues of population, food, exports, employment and development are examined along with First World concerns for investment, trade, employment and political influence. The roles of multinational corporations, international agencies, the drug trade and other major factors in the world economic system are also explored.

ANTH 250: Modern Latin America (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino/Latin American Studies program
This course explores the societies and cultures of those who live in the related, yet different, countries of this dynamic region. Their multiple heritages, modern institutions, changing lifestyles and world context are examined.

ANTH 251: Native Americans (3) 

*Offered annually
This course focuses on the social and cultural adaptations made by the first Americans to the environments of North America. The transformations that have occurred since contact and the present conditions for Native Americans will also be explored.

ANTH 265: Middle Eastern Cultures and Societies (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Middle Eastern Studies program
*Offered annually
The Middle East is built on a magnificent legacy of civilizations dating back to ancient times. Today, the Middle East continues to offer the world a rich cultural contribution. This course explores the peoples and cultures of the Middle East and offers an anthropological understanding of the diversity in the Middle East by examining societal differences in cultural practices, male-female relations, music, literature, kinship systems, religions and traditions, history and heritage, ethnic minorities, social identity and social change. This course will also analyze the impact of colonialism and imperialism on the contemporary political and group conflicts among the various peoples of the Middle East. 

ANTH 285: Special Topics in Anthropology (3)

The subject matter of this course will vary, depending on student interest and faculty resources. Examples of topics that might be included are warfare, conflict and aggression, peoples of Europe and medical anthropology. Open to students of all majors.

ANTH 295: Great Discoveries in Archaeology (3)

This course is a journey of discovery and exploration of our human past covering more than 4 million years and spanning all continents. The course explores ancient civilizations and surveys their most important sites and creations. The archaeological discoveries range from the treasure of the Tutankhamun tomb in Egypt, to the less spectacular but important, fossil record in Africa. Illustrated lectures, hands-on projects and analysis of material remains left behind by the earlier peoples will introduce students to ancient achievements that capture our imagination and motivate us to learn more about our past.

ANTH 309: Gender and Globalization (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 309
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
This course examines the economic, socio-political and cultural aspects of globalization within the framework of contemporary debates about gender. The main focus will be on how globalization affects gender roles, ideology and the experiences of men and women in transnational contexts. Our own discussion of the meaning of globalization will address questions about the novel character of globalization, shifts in labor and production practices and the contested relevance of the nation-state. 

ANTH 330: Folklore (3)

*Cross Ref: ENGL 330
Introduction to the study of the folklore of the major areas of the world, concentrating on the study of the folktale.

ANTH 355: Who Owns the Past? (3)

Through the use of case studies, this course tracks some of the uses and abuses of archaeology and the cultural past, in an attempt to understand how this constructed past is used to strengthen religious, national and ethnic loyalties. This course will also focus on the ethical issues related to archaeology and cultural property collection, repatriation, looting and museum representation of the self and other.

ANTH: 370: Topics in Anthropology (1-6)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in sociology or anthropology
The subject matter of this course will vary depending upon faculty and student interest and faculty resources. Offerings might include: magic, witchcraft and sorcery, managing cultural differences and anthropology of aging.

ANTH 385: Fieldwork in Anthropology/Archaeology (1-6)

*Prerequisites: Anthropology 101 or 105 and consent of instructor
Participation in anthropological research and/or archaeological field excavations or survey overseas or in the U.S. under the supervision of SXU faculty anthropologists/archaeologists.

ANTH 390: Independent Study (1-6)

*Prerequisite: 6 credit hours in anthropology, junior standing and consent of department chair and instructor
*Offered by special arrangement
Students who have done exceptionally well may take this course to pursue a topic of their own choosing. The student's eligibility, general topic, specific selection of readings and the format (e.g., a research paper, tutorial, short summary essays) will be worked out with the instructor.

Criminal Justice

CJ 101: Introduction to the Criminal Justice System (3)

*Offered annually
The course will review the historical and philosophical background of the criminal justice system. It will study the United States Constitution and its impact on modern criminal justice. It also studies the organization and jurisdiction of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies and research in criminal justice. There will be a critical evaluation of modern law enforcement.  

CJ 201: Law Enforcement and Society (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered annually
The course will examine the social and historical origins of various police systems; police culture; role and career; police in the legal system; social and legal restraints on police practices; police discretion in practice; police and the community; police organization and community control mechanisms.

CJ 202: Corrections (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered annually
This course is an overview of the history and philosophical foundations of the American correctional system. Emphasis is placed on current issues and problems in corrections, such as overcrowding, social control in prison, legal rights of prisoners and alternatives to incarceration.

CJ 210: Criminal Law (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered annually
This course is an examination of the purpose and goals of criminal law, and an analysis of the historic development of basic concepts and underpinnings of "social science." Issues include criminal law of the federal, state and local systems; an analysis of typical statutes common to all jurisdictions; and constitutional law as it relates to criminal law.

CJ 214: Law, Courts, and Justice (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered annually
An examination of the historical development and current issues in law, the legal profession and courts of justice in the United States. This course is strongly recommended for students considering a career in law. 

CJ 228:  Latinos and the Criminal Justice System (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino/Latin American Studies program
This course examines the relationship between Latinos/as and the criminal justice system. Specifically, the course explores what distinguishes Latinos/as from other racial and ethnic groups in the criminal justice system, and what sociological/criminological theories can help us understand the causes of these differences and inequalities. The course considers key variables such as historical context, ethnic and race relations, and current criminal justice policy regarding Latinos/as in the United States.

CJ 245:  Race, Class, Gender and the Criminal Justice System (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ101
The objective of this course is to examine the relationship between race, class, gender, and the criminal justice system. Throughout the course, we will examine the multiple and intersecting ways these concepts shape the criminal justice process.  Specifically, how do these socially constructed axioms influence a variety of institutional contexts such as law enforcement, courts and corrections? The goal is to provide students with knowledge and understanding of the criminal justice system from the position of under-represented groups in America. The course will examine key variables such as historical and community context, ethnic and race relations, and current criminal justice policy.

CJ 283: Gangs and Society (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 283
*Offered annually
In this course the social roots of street gangs in modern society are explored, along with their growth, recruitment and organization. The relationships of gangs to each other, to crime and violence, to the law, and to the community and schools are also explored.

CJ 294: Statistics and Research Design I (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 294
*Prerequisite: CJ 101, either MATH 105, MATH 200, or other approved college-level math placement and 3 credit hours in sociology, anthropology or criminal justice
*Offered annually, every fall
This course examines the fundamental principles and tools of social science research. Students will develop a basic literacy that enables them to understand and evaluate the merits and limits of various research strategies and tools of analysis, including social science statistics.

CJ 295: Statistics and Research Design II (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 295
*Prerequisite: SOC/CJ 294
*Offered annually, every spring
This course examines social science problem solving through the use of various research tools, methods and research designs. This portion of the sequence will incorporate learning with hands-on practice.

CJ 302: Organized Crime (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
The course provides an overview of organized crime in the U.S. beginning with definitions of the phenomenon and analysis of the history of organized crime, including ethnic patterns and cross-cultural comparisons. We will also consider the competing explanations for organized crime in the U.S., policy issues and techniques used to combat organized crime.

CJ 303:  Police Administration (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
This course will review the evolution of police management, organizational theory, and leadership skills of successful police administrators. This course will also review the issues surrounding human resource management, stress and police personnel, labor relations, legal aspects of police administration, planning and decision-making, and financial management.

CJ 306:  Special Topics (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
This course will focus on studies from a variety of disciplines and perspectives on justice and society.

CJ 307: Juvenile Justice and Delinquency (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
This course considers the problem of delinquency in culture and its relation to conventional culture. We will examine the introduction to delinquent lifestyles and the relationship to adult criminal behavior.

CJ 311: Probation and Parole (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered annually
This course provides an overview of the history and philosophical foundations of probation and parole in the United States as particular segments of the criminal justice system. We will consider theoretical concerns exemplified in probation and parole supervision, as well as review and evaluate community-based corrections and the role of probation and parole. Current issues and problems in probation and parole will be explored, relating to the pre-sentence report, determinate versus indeterminate sentencing, the law enforcement role of the probation and parole officer, and legal decisions affecting probation and parole practice will be explored.

CJ 312: Criminology (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101 and another 6 credit hours in criminal justice
*Offered annually
This course is an examination of the major theories of crime and criminal behavior from a variety of disciplines: biology, psychology, sociology, etc., and their policy implications.

CJ 316: Victimology (3)

This course will review victimology as an evolving discipline. It will examine the elements of this new field, including the development of the discipline, the economic and other costs of crime to victims, the use of victimization surveys, services and programs for victims and the implications of the victim-offender system on the criminal justice process.

CJ 317: Violence Against Women and Girls (3) 

Studies the various forms of violence for which females are victimized at significantly higher rates. Students will examine (a) the theories related to female victimization, (b) the impact of stereotypes and myths on societal perceptions of female victimization, (c) the criminal justice system response to female victims and (d) the impact of victimization on the victims themselves and on females in general.

CJ 318: Globalization and Crime (3)   

This course examines how economic global dependencies create opportunities for crime and how travel, communication, and other technologies facilitate its occurrence. Illegal gun trafficking, human trafficking, drug trafficking, cyber-crime, maritime privacy, counterfeiting, and environmental resource acquisition will be examined. The course will explore the criminal justice response to global crime, as well as the impact on victims and perpetrators.

CJ 320:  Ethics in Criminal Justice (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
Ethical and moral decision making is an important dilemma that students who enter the criminal justice field will face during their careers. The purpose of this course will be to provide students with an understanding of ethics and justice as well as provide them opportunities to discuss ethical decision-making and the implications of such decision-making.

CJ 336: Criminal Investigation (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101
This course will examine the techniques of modern criminal investigation. These include crime scene activities, chain of evidence, interviewing and interrogation, records and intelligence, undercover operations and the use of informants, etc.

CJ 337: Criminalistics (3)

*Cross Ref: PHSCI 237
*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*Offered alternate years in the spring
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the capabilities and limitations of the criminalistics laboratory. The student will review the application of natural sciences to the problems encountered in the examination of evidence and the use of evidence in case presentation.

CJ 338: Drugs and the Criminal Justice System (3)

*Prerequisite: junior/senior status
*Offered annually
This course focuses on a comprehensive examination of the issue of drug abuse: history, causes, treatment, drug trafficking, drug law enforcement, policy issues.

CJ 345: Jurisprudence and Gender (3)

*Cross Ref: SOC 345
*Prerequisite: CJ 101
*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
The Rule of Law is meant to establish a system of rules founded on principles rather than personalities. In this course we examine a system that is gendered, built on the story of men's lives. Our analysis takes us through at least three major strains of legal argument that begin with different assumptions and lead to different policy outcomes but all of which are guided by a notion of gender equality.

CJ 366: Internship (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101 and junior status
*Offered annually
The student will spend a specified number of hours working in a criminal justice agency, reporting regularly to an academic supervisor and receiving academic assignments appropriate to his/her type of work. All field placements must be approved in advance by the course instructor.

CJ 367: Individual Research (3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 294, junior status
In this course the student prepares a research proposal and conducts field or library research. No classes; student meets with faculty member as required.

CJ 368: CJ Senior Seminar and Project (3)

*Prerequisite: junior or senior status and consent of the instructor
*This course is open to criminal justice majors ONLY
*Offered annually
This course entails the pursuit of a major topic in criminal justice or in the function of criminological inquiry in the arena of criminal justice. Students will compile a portfolio that will consist of the following: an original research project, a biography of the student's undergraduate development within the major and the senior year assessment questionnaire.

CJ 390: Independent Study (1-3)

*Prerequisite: CJ 101, 6 credit hours in criminal justice, junior/senior status and consent of department chair and instructor
*Offered by special arrangement
Students who have done exceptionally well may take this course to pursue a topic of their own choosing. The student's eligibility, general topic, specific selection of readings and the format (e.g. a research paper, tutorial, short summary essays) will be worked out with the instructor.

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