Department of English and Foreign Languages

English

English is more than a language; it is both a way of thinking about the world and a world in itself, a place where the imagination and intellect combine to teach us about the most important subject of all ourselves as human beings. When you study language and literature, you encounter an important expression of human experience and humane values. You also learn about history, philosophy, law, politics, medicine, anthropology, sociology, theology and business, for the study of literature is the study of people, both as cultural and as psychological beings, and there are practically no limits to your subject matter. English is of course a language, but it is also the words and thoughts that for centuries have given insight into what it means to be alive.

Over the years, English has been a route to rewarding careers in business, publishing, education and government. The reason for this success is simple: employers have come to realize that English majors have been taught to be innovative and articulate. They also realize that as society continues to grow more technical and complex, key personnel will be needed to help people communicate with each other as people. As long as we depend upon language to make ourselves understood, the English major will always be practical.

The English major also leads to a wide variety of professional graduate programs. Master's and doctoral programs in English accept students who want to prepare for college teaching and research. Historically, law schools have drawn their students from both political science and English. MBA programs and medical schools have also begun turning to majors from the liberal arts, such as English, for students. The English major at Saint Xavier University is flexible enough to allow for the addition of those basic courses in business or science needed for admission into professional programs.

Sigma Tau Delta, the International English Honor Society, has a chapter on campus, Alpha Epsilon Xi. The chapter, moderated by a faculty member, sponsors literary activities and, by encouraging student participation in regional and national conferences, promotes literary research and creativity among its members.

Faculty

N. Hathcock, Chair; A. Stolley, Writing Program Director; A. Bonadonna, English Education Coordinator; S. Ambrose;
N. Boyer; J. Gutowski; J. Hiltner; A. Karim; A. Kolich; G. Rossetti; M. Tegan.

Purpose Statement

Goal One: The English program is dedicated to each major's understanding of English as a discipline and to each student's understanding of the goals and methods of contemporary literary study. Each major should:

Goal Two: The English program is dedicated to the major's experiencing the study of English as a reflection of values. Each major should:

Goal Three: The English program is dedicated to each major's achieving his/her full potential as an inquisitive, articulate and analytical individual. Each major should:

English Majors

The department offers two major programs in English:

The English major is a 37 credit hour program that provides a general grounding in the disciplines of English. This curriculum is based upon a guideline approach to the design of courses and course requirements. A 300-level course may meet more than one guideline. The guideline-based courses aim at developing in students informed habits of thought, research, discussion and writing. It emphasizes both the knowledge and skills that will prepare students for post-baccalaureate study or for career opportunities.

The English education major is a 46 credit hour program designed for students who wish to become English language arts teachers in Illinois middle and secondary schools. As well as providing a strong foundation in the disciplines of English, this major focuses on the preparation of teachers according to NCATE/NCTE and Illinois Content Area Standards for Educators. Students who seek Illinois secondary certification through the English education major must also apply for admission to the School of Education minor program in secondary education and complete the courses required for that minor, as well as state certification requirements.

Requirements for the English Major

(3 credit hours count toward the university general education requirement in literature/fine arts.)

All majors must complete, with grades of C or better, 37 credit hours. No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement within the major.

Core Requirements

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  ENGL 207 The Study of Literature (3)
  ENGL 201 English Literature to 1700 (3)
or ENGL 202 English Literature Since 1700 (3)
  ENGL 203 American Literature to 1865 (3)
or ENGL 204 American Literature Since 1865 (3)

 

 

Elective Courses

Eight English courses at the 300 level.  These electives courses must be selected to meet all of the following guidelines.  One course may meet more than one guideline, but eight courses are required even if the guidelines are met in fewer than eight courses.

Guidelines for 300-level electives:

 
  One course in a single author (e.g., ENGL 301, 304, 307 and single-author 360s)  
  One course in a single period, whether literary or historical (e.g., ENGL 300, 302, 303, 310, 311, 313, 317, 321, 322, 323, 328, 333, 345 and period 360s)  
  One course in a specific genre (e.g., ENGL 303, 315, 325, 330, 331, 334, 345 and genre 360s)  
  Two courses that emphasize a specific, clearly defined contemporary theoretical and methodological approach (any 300-level literature course with this designated emphasis)  
  Two courses that emphasize multinational or comparative study, minority writers, women writers, gender studies, or class issues in print or film (e.g., ENGL 331, 332, 333, 336, 347, 348 and specific 360s)  
  Two courses that emphasize writing and language, such as creative writing, writing and/or editing for print or media, or the history of the English language (e.g. ENGL 342, 350, 354, 357, 358 and 359) Note: For English education majors, ENGL 241 meets this guideline.  
  English education only: One course that emphasizes reading (ENGL 371)  
   
Senior Seminar*:  

*Course content will change with instructor, but the following features will be constant:

  1. Thesis (18-25 pages) produced during ENGL 395
  2. Public presentation of thesis during ENGL 396 (following semester)
  3. Portfolio of representative accomplishments in the major, completed during ENGL 396
 

Requirements for the English Education Major

(3 credit hours count toward the university general education requirement in literature/fine arts.)

All majors must complete, with grades of C or better, 46 credit hours. No course may be used to satisfy more than one requirement within the major. Guideline met is in brackets.

Core Courses (31)
  ENGL 207 The Study of Literature (3)
  ENGL 201 English Literature to 1700 (3)
  ENGL 202 English Literature Since 1700 (3)
  ENGL 203 American Literature to 1865 (3)
  ENGL 204 American Literature Since 1865 (3)
  ENGL 241 Introduction to Language and Linguistics[6] (3)
  ENGL 304 Shakespeare [1] (3)
  ENGL 347 World Literature to 1500 [5] (3)
  ENGL 348 World Literature Since 1500 [5] (3)
  ENGL 395 Senior Seminar (3)
  ENGL 396 Senior Seminar (1)
Electives (9 credit hours) (9)
  ENGL 300-level courses covering guidelines 2, 3 and 4 (9)
English education courses

(6 credit hours + 3 credit hours in ENGL 373 from School of Education requirements.)
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  ENGL 356 Teaching Writing and Language in Middle and Secondary Schools [6] (3)
  ENGL 371 Teaching Reading and Literature in Middle and Secondary Schools [7] (3)
  ENGL 373 Methods of Teaching English in Middle and Secondary Schools (3)

English education majors seeking certification must be admitted to the School of Education, maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and complete all English education major courses, all general education courses and all professional education courses with a minimum grade of "C." Beginning with new students admitted in Fall, 2010, students need a minimum of a 2.5 GPA in the major at the time they apply for student teaching. This program provides a strong foundation in English language arts and focuses on the preparation of teachers according to NCATE/NCTE and Illinois Content Standards for Educators. The undergraduate English education program has been granted National Recognition by the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE). Candidates must successfully complete state certification requirements and procedures. It is the responsibility of the student to ascertain and fulfill the requirements for the degree program. The major advisor will assist the student in this responsibility.

Additional Requirements for All Majors

English 395 Course by Special Arrangement Option

Students may also satisfy the three required credit hours of ENGL 395 (senior seminar) by pursuing an independent senior project under the direction of a faculty member. Students must submit a mentor-approved proposal for the project before the beginning of the first semester of their senior year. The proposal must indicate the focus of the project, the student's theoretical and/or methodological approach to be used in the essay, and a preliminary bibliography documenting that the student has already built a solid foundation for the project. The proposal must also indicate how the project will satisfy the criteria of Undergraduate Research Levels Four and Five (see below). By the end of the semester in which they complete ENGL 395, students who pursue this option must produce a documented senior thesis (18-25 pages) that satisfies the research criteria. Students are then still required to complete ENGL 396 in the following semester.

E-Portfolio Requirement

In order for the department to measure its effectiveness in reaching the learning objectives set for our majors, the English e-portfolio is required, to be completed in the semester the student enrolls for ENGL 396. However, the requirement is conceived of as more than just an assessment tool. Carefully compiled and revised, this collection of a student's best work can also be useful in job searches and applications for graduate study.

Internships

For majors not anticipating secondary school teaching as a career or graduate school, the department highly recommends ENGL 365 (internship of 1-3 credit hours). These opportunities can significantly enable student decisions about employment and career paths.

Undergraduate Research Levels

Scholarly research is vital to the success of undergraduates during their academic careers. The ability to conduct such research effectively also enables those students to transition to graduate study or professional environments more quickly and with greater reward. The English Department therefore finds it useful to conceive of scholarly research as a process through which the adept student moves, acquiring different levels of sophistication along the way. Courses are designed to encourage and test that skill at different stages of development.

Level One: Students must demonstrate the ability to comprehend and apply a single, critical source on a topic.
Level Two: Students must demonstrate the ability to comprehend two or more critical sources that express controversy and/or disagreement on a topic.
Level Three: Students must demonstrate the ability to use primary sources or critical sources from other disciplines to formulate a new position on a topic.
Level Four: Students must demonstrate the ability to formulate the basis of critical controversy and/or disagreement in the sources of a topic, and to apply that disagreement in the exploration of a topic.
Level Five: Students must demonstrate the ability to engage in independent research/study and to formulate new topics of inquiry.

Students are expected to attain competency at each level and be able to demonstrate that competency with the work collected in their English e-portfolio.

English Minor

All English minors must complete, with grades of C or above, ENGL 207, The Study of Literature (3 credit hours) and an additional 15 credit hours of ENGL courses numbered 154-399.

English minors should meet with the department chair as soon as possible to plan their minor, which can include a concentration in some aspect of English studies, such as literary genres, American or British literature, a historical approach to literature, multicultural literature, cultural studies, or language.

Students preparing to teach English should take ENGL 356, ENGL 371 and ENGL 373. They should also consult with the English education coordinator for further recommendations.

Writing Minor

All writing minors must complete, with grades of C or above, ENGL 350 Advanced Writing and an additional 15 credit- hours from the following list of electives, with no more than 6 credit hours coming from the Department of Communication.

COMM 103 Writing for the Mass Media (3)
COMM 110 Newswriting and Reporting (3)
SPAN 200 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
COMM 201 Copy Editing and Publication Design (3)
ENGL 210 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
COMM 244 Introduction to Public Relations (3)
COMM 305 Television and Film Scriptwriting (3)
COMM 307 Advertising Copywriting (3)
ENGL 354 Business and Professional Writing (3)
ENGL 356 The Teaching of Writing (3)
ENGL 358 Advanced Creative Writing (3)
ENGL 359 Creative Writing Workshop (3)
ENGL 357 Topics in Writing (3)
ENGL 365 Internship in Writing (1-3)
XXX A 300-level course in any discipline identified as "writing intensive" by the University Writing Council (3)

This list of electives may be updated as new courses in writing are developed and submitted to the Department of English and Foreign Languages for inclusion in the minor. All writing minors should meet with the director of the writing program as soon as possible to plan the focus of their minor on creative or business and professional writing.

Foreign Languages

The foreign languages program offers a major and a minor in Spanish, as well as specific courses geared to meet the needs of students in other departments. The foreign language curriculum covers the three main areas of language -- skills development, literature, and history and civilization. All courses are open to qualified students seeking meaningful contact with another culture by acquiring skills in oral and written communication in the foreign language, by studying the history and civilization of another country, or through a comparative approach.

Current emphasis on the international dimension of the college experience makes foreign language study particularly relevant and useful because it not only helps students achieve a truly liberal education, but also enhances their preparation to function in today's world. Knowledge of a foreign language is an essential component of both the international business program (see business) and the international studies program (see history and political science).

Graduates of Saint Xavier University find that the programs in foreign languages offer sound preparation for graduate and professional schools and for rewarding careers in fields such as teaching, business, government and community relations.

Faculty

 O. Vilella, Program Director; A. Gatti; F. Marolda; S. Mosel; H. Yasin

Admission to the Major

  1. End of sophomore year or junior status.
  2. 2.0 minimum cumulative grade-point average.
  3. 2.5 minimum grade-point average in Spanish for those intending to teach.
  4. Consent of departmental faculty.

Transfer Students

Transfer students may apply for admission to the department after:

  1. Satisfactory completion of a minimum of 12 credit hours at Saint Xavier University.
  2. Satisfactory completion of 6 credit hours in the Foreign Languages Program (these may be included in the 12 credit hours above).
  3. Consent of departmental faculty.

Requirements for a Major in Spanish

Students wishing to major in Spanish at Saint Xavier University have two options:

Option I: Spanish Language, Literature and Civilization

The program of a major in Spanish includes a minimum of 36 credit hours in Spanish beginning at the 200-level. It is designed to provide a solid foundation in Spanish language, literature and civilization. Courses are taken in three areas: literature, culture and civilization and language development.

Required Courses (36)
  SPAN 200 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
  SPAN 210 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3)
  SPAN 220 Interpretation of Texts (3)
  SPAN 395 Senior Seminar (3)
Spanish Electives
Choose 24 credit hours from the following*:
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  SPAN 205 Language and Culture (3)
  SPAN 206 Language and Culture (3)
  SPAN 207 Spanish for the Social Services (3)
  SPAN 208 Spanish for the Social Services (3)
  SPAN 215 Business Spanish (3)
  SPAN 216 Business Spanish (3)
  SPAN 231 Introduction to Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3)
  SPAN 232 Introduction to Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3)
  SPAN 251 Individual Reading Program (3)
  SPAN 252 Individual Reading Program (3)
  SPAN 260 Special Topics

   (3)

  SPAN 307 Golden Age Poetry (3)
  SPAN 312 Literary Responses to Armed Conflicts in the Twentieth Century (3)
  SPAN 313 Romanticism and Post Romanticism (3)
  SPAN 314 Realism and the Turn of the Century (3)
  SPAN 315 Imaginary Caribbean: Literature of Cuba and Puerto Rico (3)
  SPAN 316 Latin American Responses to Colonization (3)
  SPAN 317 Narrative and Spectacle of the Mexican Revolution (3)
  SPAN 319 Cervantes' Don Quixote (3)
  SPAN 334 Film and Literature (3)
  SPAN 391 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literatures and/or Civilizations (1-3)
  SPAN 392 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literatures and/or Civilizations (1-3)

*Courses from other departments might be approved to fulfill the culture and civilization section of the major. Sample courses for this section are: Latino Studies 101 Introduction to Latino Studies; Art 222 Art of the Renaissance through the Enlightenment; Political Science 225 Latin American Politics; History 240 History of Latin America; Sociology 250 Modern Latin America.

Option II: Spanish for Social and Community Service

This option is intended primarily for those students who plan to make use of the Spanish language as a tool in social and community-related work.

Required Courses (45)
  SPAN 200 Advanced Grammar and Composition (3)
  SPAN 210 Advanced Spanish Conversation (3)
  SPAN 300 Field Work (3)
Spanish Electives
Choose 15 credit hours from the following*:
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  SPAN 205 Language and Culture (3)
  SPAN 206 Language and Culture (3)
  SPAN 207 Spanish for the Social Services (3)
  SPAN 208 Spanish for the Social Services (3)
  SPAN 231 Introduction to Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3)
  SPAN 232 Introduction to Hispanic Culture and Civilization (3)
  SPAN 251 Individual Reading Program (3)
  SPAN 252 Individual Reading Program (3)
  SPAN 307 Golden Age Poetry (3)
  SPAN 312 Literary Responses to Armed Conflicts in the Twentieth Century (3)
  SPAN 313 Romanticism and Post Romanticism (3)
  SPAN 314 Realism and the Turn of the Century (3)
  SPAN 315 Imaginary Caribbean: Literature of Cuba and Puerto Rico (3)
  SPAN 316 Latin American Responses to Colonization (3)
  SPAN 317 Narrative and Spectacle of the Mexican Revolution (3)
  SPAN 319 Cervantes' Don Quixote (3)
  SPAN 334 Film and Literature (3)
  SPAN 391 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literatures and/or Civilizations (1 - 3)
  SPAN 392 Selected Topics in Hispanic Literatures and/or Civilizations (1 - 3)

*Courses from other departments might be approved to fulfill the culture and civilization section of the major. Sample courses for this section are:Latino Studies 101 Introduction to Latino Studies; Art 222 Art of the Renaissance through the Enlightenment; Political Science 225 Latin American Politics; History 240 History of Latin America; Sociology 250 Modern Latin America.

 

Other Discipline
Twenty-one required hours in another area related to the career objectives of each student. Courses can be double-counted as part of another major. These courses are determined on an individual basis by consultation with departmental faculty.  

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Spanish Education Program

Spanish students who are seeking teaching certification must be admitted to the School of Education, complete all requirements for Option I: Spanish Language, Literature and Civilization, all general education courses and all professional education courses with a minimum grade of C and maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50.

Option I provides a strong foundation in Spanish and focuses on the preparation of teachers according to NCATE/ACTFL and Illinois Content Standards for Educators. Candidates must successfully complete state certification requirements and the Oral Proficiency Interview (OPI) test. Consult the School of Education section of the catalog for specific requirements and procedures. Beginning in Fall, 2010, students need a minimum of a 2.5 GPA in the major at the time they apply for student teaching. It is the responsibility of each student to ascertain and fulfill the requirements for the degree program. The major advisor will assist the student in this area.

Minor in Spanish

Completion, with the grade of C or above, of 18 credit hours in the foreign language beginning at the intermediate level (103-104). No more than 3 credit hours of foreign language courses taught in English. 

( ) = credit hours / / = classroom hours

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