History and Political Science Course Descriptions

History

Introductory Courses

HIST 101: World History to 1500 (3)

*Offered fall and spring semesters
The first of a two-part sequence, this course examines the development of societies and cultures from Neolithic times up to 1500. The course gives particular attention to the ways in which differing patterns of social organization have shaped the dynamic interaction between human societies and their environments. Students in the history education and social sciences education majors may be required to complete additional assignments.

HIST 102: World History Since 1500 (3)

*Offered fall, spring and summer
The second of a two-part sequence, this course examines the ongoing development of societies around the world with a particular emphasis on the increasing scale and intensity of global interaction in the period since 1500. Major topics include population growth, technological change, inter-continental migration, and the rise of a global economy. Students in the history education and social sciences education majors may be required to complete additional assignments.

HIST 103: United States History to 1877 (3)

*Offered fall and spring
This course is a general survey of American social and political history from pre-Columbian civilization through Reconstruction. It will address issues of slavery and freedom, gender, class, race, diplomacy, war, politics, economics and culture. 

HIST 104: United States History Since 1877 (3)

*Offered fall and spring
This course is a general survey of American social and political history since the late 19th century. It will address themes of gender, class, race, politics, diplomacy, war, economics and culture.   

HIST 150: Themes in History (3)

*Offered fall and spring 
This course explores historical themes of broad importance in shaping our contemporary world. Oriented toward students taking General Education credit. Topics vary.

American History

HIST 220: History of Black Chicago (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies program
*Offered annually
This course examines the history of Black Chicago and the contributions of African-Americans to the life and culture of the city. Periods include Civil War to Reconstruction; World War I to WWII; Postwar Chicago and Civil Rights Years; the Harold Washington Years and 21st Century Black Chicago.

HIST 221: American Foreign Relations (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in history
*Offered alternate years
What are the responsibilities of global leadership and how did the United States attain such power? From Cold War to post-Cold War, the essence of America in the world will be analyzed. Historical trends, current economic and political events, differing theories of America's world role and the ethics of American diplomacy and war will be assessed.

HIST 222: History and Politics of Welfare in America (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or government
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the politics of welfare in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the effects of welfare policies and practices on the individual. The evolution of welfare policies will be linked to the historical changes in American society.

HIST 226: Vietnam and America (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course details the history of the Vietnam War from French colonialism to the American departure in 1975. The war will be assessed from both a political and military perspective, as well as its impact on domestic protest and peace movements.

HIST 228: African-American History (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the history of African-Americans from slavery to freedom, beginning with the slave trade and concluding with the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. Topics include slave religions, abolitionism, the Harlem Renaissance, as well as leading African-American voices.

HIST 230: Illinois History (3) 

*Offered annually, fall semester
This course surveys Illinois history from Indian occupation through the present. This course will focus on integrating Illinois history with broader developments in American history, and will include the following topics: Illinois' settlement by the colonial French, British and American settlement in the late 18th century, territorial Illinois, antebellum settlement patterns and politics, the Civil War, late 19th century immigration and industrialization, black migration to Chicago, the Great Depression and World War II, postwar conflicts over race and housing, Chicago's political machine, and deindustrialization. Priority enrollment will go to students in the History Education and Social Sciences Education programs.

HIST 235: Colonial America (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course surveys colonial American history from the pre-contact period through the American Revolution. Topics include motives for settlement, the development of political, economic and social structures, environmental consequences and the impact on indigenous populations.

HIST 236: Early American Republic (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours of American history
*Offered alternate years
This course examines the history of the United States from 1776 to 1820, with a special emphasis on formative political developments such as the writing and ratification of the Constitution, the creation of political parties and nascent democratization. Other topics include diplomacy and national security, westward expansion, pre-industrial manufacturing and slavery.

HIST 250: Topics in American History (3)

This course focuses on special topics in American history. This course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

European History

HIST 206: Europe in the Middle Ages (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explains the development of European civilization from the late Roman Empire to 1500. The emphasis will be on social, economic, cultural history.

HIST 208: Modern Europe 1789-Present (3)

This course is a survey of the history of modern Europe from the French Revolution through the late 20th-century, emphasizing social, cultural, economic and political developments. Also interrogates the historical notion of the "modern period" with its connotations of decisive rupture from the past and unprecedented acceleration of historical change.

HIST 211: Women in Modern European History (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Women and Gender Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the history of women in a European context since the mid 18th-century. Ideas about women, the changing social and economic conditions of women's lives and women's political activism will be examined.

HIST 251: Topics in European History (3)

This course focuses on special topics in European history. This course can be repeated when a different topic is offered.

HIST 320: The European Enlightenment (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 102 and HIST 200
*Offered occasionally 
This course explores the origins of the Enlightenment in the late 17th-century and its development as an intellectual, cultural and social phenomenon through the 18th-century. Writings by Locke, Voltaire, Rousseau, Kant and Wollstonecraft as well as recent historical interpretations will be studied.

HIST 321: The Old Regime and French Revolution (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 102 and HIST 200
*Offered occasionally
This course begins with an exploration of French society in the 18th-century the old regime examining the structure of society, the political process and the circulation of ideas in pre-revolutionary France. The stages of revolution from reform, to liberal revolution, to radicalization, to reaction will be explored in detail, as will the Revolution's contribution to modern politics and human rights.

Non-Western History

HIST 240: History of Latin America (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino/Latin American Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course examines the processes of Spanish and Portuguese conquest and colonization of the New World and the development of Latin American nations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. It focuses on changes in the structures of political and social institutions of rule and social and political resistance movements.

HIST 241: World of the Indian Ocean (3)

*Offered occasionally
This course is an exploration the history of trade and migration and their role in fostering cultural contacts between the regions that border the Indian Ocean (Middle East, Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China).

HIST 242: History of Africa (3)

*This program fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies program
*Offered alternate years
A survey of major historical themes that have shaped African life over long periods of time and across the continent. Topics include trade and migration, ecology and human adaptation, the family and sexual division of labor, colonialism and the challenges of the post-colonial period.

HIST 243: History of the Middle East (3) 

*This program fulfills a requirement in the Middle Eastern Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course is a survey of the Middle East, its people, geography, cultures and history. Primary emphasis will be upon the Islamic period (seventh century-present) and upon the interrelated development of religious beliefs, political and social ideologies and cultural practices.

HIST 244: History of East Asia (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explores the political, economic and cultural history of East Asia, especially China and Japan, and the conflicts arising from the impact of Western imperialism.

HIST 245: History of Modern Japan (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is a survey of social, political, economic and cultural history of modern Japan. Themes include the influence of cultural borrowing from Asia and the West; the influence of the Tokugawa period on modern Japan; the Meiji Restoration and Taisho Democracy; the origins of the Pacific War; the American occupation and the postwar economic miracle; and contemporary Japanese society.

HIST 247: History of Mexico (3)

*This program fulfills a requirement in the Latino/Latin American Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course introduces students to the study of the history of Mexico from the late colonial to the modern period (1750-2000), with special emphasis on the construction of national heroes and national histories and popular resistance to official histories. Topics include independence, national identity, imperialism, revolution, racial and ethnic identity, social movements and immigration.

HIST 252: Topics in Non-Western History (3)

This course focuses on special topics in Non-Western history. This course can be repeated when a different topic is offered.

HIST 351: Colonial Legacy in Africa (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in history and HIST 200
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the history of Africa during the period of European rule and the continuing importance of colonial-era institutions and practices in post-colonial Africa. Emphasis upon Africa south of the Sahara, with comparative reference to other regions of the formerly colonized world.

Thematic, Comparative and Methodological History Courses

HIST 200: Introduction to the Discipline of History (3)

*Prerequisite: Two 100-level history courses and major status in History, History Education or Social Science Education, or consent of instructor 
*Offered spring semesters
*NOTE: HIST 200 is a prerequisite for all 300-level HIST courses
This course introduces department majors to the conventions and research methods of the discipline of history. The course requires students to complete a substantial research paper. Topics will vary according to instructor. 

HIST 204: Hiroshima and the Nuclear Age (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in history or political science
*Offered alternate years
This course will address the rise of atomic weapons from the Manhattan Project to Hiroshima and the emergence of the thermonuclear age, as well as issues of nonproliferation, deterrence, radiation, strategic doctrine, specific weapons systems and the nuclearization of culture.

HIST 253: Topics in History (3)

This course will explore important topics of global, comparative or thematic significance. May be repeated when a new topic is offered.

HIST 361: Studies in Social History (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 200 or instructor's consent
*Offered occasionally
This course introduces students to social history through the use of secondary readings. Topics such as the family, sexuality, protest, social movements, crime, sports, industrialization, urbanization, death and education will be explored. The course will incorporate readings in European, American and non-Western history and is organized as a colloquium.

HIST 362: Capitalism, Socialism and Social Justice (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 200 and/or instructor's consent
*Offered alternate years
This course examines the rise of capitalism in the late 18th-century and the socialist response in the 19th-century and analyzes the theories of Smith, Marx, Engels, Sumner and Spencer. What has been the impact of these systems upon social class, alienation, poverty, war and peace, both historically and in contemporary society?  Explores topics including health care, globalization, the nature of work and leisure, the role of government as an agent of social justice or repression, and the role of elites within the political economy of capitalist and socialist societies.

HIST 370: Field Experience (3)

*Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing and instructor's consent
The course is for students who perform internships, work for government agencies, archives, museums, libraries and historical societies, or present an off-campus experience judged by the faculty advisor and department chair to be of significant value in political science education.

General (Advanced)

HIST 348-49: Issues in History (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 200
This course includes selected topics in history developed through analytical and interpretive readings. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

HIST 395: Senior Seminar (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 200 plus one 300-level HIST course and senior standing in history or history education
*Offered only fall semesters 
This course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate, refine and consolidate knowledge of skills and content acquired during their previous years of study. It is a collaborative as well as a culminating learning experience that permits students to pursue individual research projects and submit them to their peers. The seminar will center upon a topic to be determined by the instructor.

HIST 399: Independent Study (3)

*Prerequisite: HIST 200, one 300-level HIST course and consent of instructor
Students who have done exceptionally well may take this course in order to pursue a topic of their own choosing. The student's eligibility, general topic, specific selection of readings and the format (e.g., a research paper, tutorial, short summary essays) will be worked out with the supervising instructor who, with the consent of the chair, will determine the field in which the course will be credited.

Political Science Courses

American Politics

POLSC 101: Introduction to US Government (3)

*Offered fall, spring and summer
This course is an analysis of the political structures and processes in the United States. Topics include the Constitution, parties and elections, interest group politics and public policy.

POLSC 206: State and Local Government (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is an analysis of political structures and processes at the state and municipal level in the United States.

POLSC 207: Urban Politics (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is a contemporary and historical analysis of American urban politics. Topics will include uneven development of cities, segregation, and the concomitant development of suburbs, as well as the evolution of urban political machines.

POLSC 308: American Constitutional Law (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or government
*Offered annually
This course focuses on leading principles of the Constitution as seen in court decisions with special emphasis on government powers, federal-state conflicts and the fundamental rights of individuals.

Electorial Politics

POLSC 215: Political Parties and Elections (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is an analysis of electoral politics and political parties in the United States. Topics may include party alignments and critical elections, party organization, representation and the role of parties in organizing government.

POLSC 216: Congress and the Presidency (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explores the interaction of executive and legislative bodies in national-level policy making in the United States. Topics may include the legislative process, agenda setting, budgetary politics and policy sub-governments.

Public Administration/Public Politics

POLSC 208: Public Administration (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is an introduction to concepts, ideas and issues of administrative practice in the United States. Topics will include bureaucratic organization, administrative responsiveness, and the practice and ethics of public management.

POLSC 222: History and Politics of Welfare in America (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or government
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the politics of welfare in the United States from colonial times to the present, with an emphasis on the effects of welfare policies and practices on the individual. The evolution of welfare policies will be linked to the historical changes in American society.

POLSC 301: Public Policy Analysis (3)

*Prerequisite: POLSC 101 and POLSC 250 
*Offered alternate years
This course examines different approaches to analyzing public policy. Policy making, implementation and outcomes of policy will be addressed. Specific areas of focus may include education policy, health policy, welfare policy or economic development policies.

International Relations

POLSC 102: World Politics (3)

*Offered fall and spring semesters
This course explores political processes in various countries and among nations. Students will encounter various approaches to the study of comparative politics and international relations. Topics include the rise of nation-states, democracy and authoritarianism, political development, war and peace, international political economy and international organizations.

POLSC 211: International Organizations (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course introduces students to theories of international cooperation and the functioning of international organizations. The course examines theories of the origin and effectiveness of international organizations and the concept of international regimes; the organization, history, and contemporary functioning of the United Nations; and explores a variety of issues addressed by international organizations-trade and finance, human rights and law, and regional development and integration and global security.

POLSC 213: Politics of National Security (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course examines various theoretical approaches to national security and the institutions and actors involved in defining and implementing national security policy in the US and in the international system. Students then use this information to explore challenges to national security of the post-Cold War era, their implications for the conduct of American foreign policy in the contemporary international environment. Key issues may include: international terrorism and failed states, regional conflicts, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, environmental degradation, economic security and arms and drug trafficking.

POLSC 334: War, Peace and Alliances (3)

*Prerequisite: POLSC 102 and POLSC 250 
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the strategic interaction among states focusing on international conflict. Topics covered will include theories of war initiating, balance of power, collective security, offense-defense balance and alliance patterns.

POLSC 336: Global Money and Power (3)

*Prerequisite: POLSC 102 and POLSC 250
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the interaction of states in the areas of trade, finance and production. Topics covered will include the nature and extent of international cooperation, North-South relations and the relations between international economic policy and international security.

Political Theory

POLSC 240: Political Theory (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course is an exposition and analysis of selected political philosophers. These may include Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, Nietzsche, among others.

POLSC 241: American Social and Political Thought (3)

*Prerequisite: 3 credit hours in U.S. history or POLSC 101
*Offered alternate years 
This course explores the central ideas of American politics from the Puritans to the present through an analysis of treatises, novels and speeches. Included will be Paine, Franklin, the Federalist Papers, Jefferson, Calhoun, Lincoln, Bellamy, Douglas and DuBois. Satisfies a Political Theory requirement in the Political Science major.

POLSC 242: African-American Political Thought (3)

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies program
*Offered alternate years
This course explores the central ideas of African-American political thought through an analysis of treatises, novels and speeches. Some of the thinkers treated in this course may be Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Richard Wright, Zora Neale Hurston, Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr.

Comparative Politics

POLSC 225: Latin American Politics (3) 

*This course fulfills a requirement in the Latino/Latin American Studies program
This course is the study of political processes and institutions in Latin American nations. Topics may include the impact of colonialism and international dependency, state-society relations and the sources of authoritarianism and democracy.

POLSC 227: African Politics (3) 

*This course fulfills a requirement in the African-American Studies program
This course explores political and social processes in sub-Saharan Africa. Topics to be covered include the legacies of colonialism, state-building, the bases of political identity, the impact of the international economy and the response to the economic crisis of the 1980's.

POLSC 228: Politics of Less Developed Areas (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explores various strategies developing countries use to achieve economic growth, political stability and improve basic human needs. Cases will be drawn from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Topics include ethnicity in state-society relations, social movements and political unrest, state formation and strategies of economic development.

POLSC 230: Regional Politics (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course treats politics within a world region. May be repeated for credit as topics vary.

POLSC 324: Contemporary Democracy (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explores both the idea and practice of democracy in the contemporary world. Topics will include democratic theory, institutions of governance, participation, the relation of democracy and capitalism and the impact of globalization on democratic processes.

Advanced and Special Studies

POLSC 160: Topics in Political Sciences (3)

*Offered occasionally
This course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Satisfies University core requirement in social sciences.

POLSC 250: Scope and Methods of Political Science (3)

This course introduces students to the methodological and conceptual questions in the discipline of political science. Topics may include definitions of political science, philosophy of the social sciences, and qualitative, quantitative and formal methodologies. This course is required of all political science majors and is a prerequisite for the Senior Seminar, POLSC 350.

POLSC 260-61: Topics in Political Science (3)

This course focuses on special topics in political science. Course may be repeated when a new topic is offered.

POLSC 262: Politics and Film (3)

*Offered alternate years
This course explores political theory and culture as revealed through film. Using ideological and cultural analysis of popular films, the course examines the intersection of art and politics.

POLSC 350: Senior Seminar (3)

*Prerequisite: POLSC 250, and one 300-level POLSC course, senior standing in political science or instructor's consent 
*Offered annually
This course is an advanced discussion and research seminar centered upon significant problems, movements and issues. This course is the capstone of students' disciplinary training in political science.

POLSC 360: Independent Study (3)

*Prerequisite: POLSC 250 and/or instructor's consent 
This course focuses on individual readings and research for accomplished students in political science. Topic to be determined by instructor and student; approval of department chair required.

POLSC 370: Field Experience (3)

*Prerequisite: Junior/senior standing; and/or instructor's consent
The course is for students who perform internships, work for government agencies, or present an off-campus experience judged by the faculty advisor and department chair to be of significant value in political science education.

Social Sciences

SOCSC 101: World Geography (3)

*Prerequisite: 30 credit hours total and 2.5 cumulative GPA
*Offered fall and spring 
This course is an introduction to general geographical knowledge for students in the social sciences and humanities. It includes the study of maps, map making, physical and human geography. It emphasizes the interaction between people and their environment, and provides a detailed study of the world's geographic regions. May be taken to satisfy University core requirement in social sciences. Students in the History Education and Social Sciences Education majors may be required to complete additional assignments. Priority enrollment will go to majors in history, history education and social sciences education.

SOCSC 105: Economics for Social Sciences (3)

*Offered annually in the fall semester
This course introduces key economic concepts including opportunity cost, supply and demand, behavior of consumers and firms, markets, money and finance. Intended primarily for students majoring in history education, social sciences education, education, and social sciences disciplines other than economics, as well as other students with an interest in the subject. May be taken to satisfy University core requirement in social sciences. Students in the history education and social sciences education majors may be required to complete additional assignments. Priority enrollment will go to students in the history education and social sciences education majors.

SOCSC 203: Social Scientific Thinking (3)

*Prerequisite: 2 courses in history or the social sciences
*Offered annually in the spring semester
This course provides an interdisciplinary overview of the social sciences with an emphasis on sociology and anthropology. It introduces the key issues, concepts and practices in social scientific thinking and research. Because this course is designed primarily History Education and Social Science Education students, the overarching theme that we will be exploring is equity in education with particular attention to issues of class, race, and gender in secondary schooling. This course contains a substantial writing component and fulfills a University core requirement in social sciences. Priority enrollment will go to students in the History Education and Social Sciences Education majors.

SOCSC 250: Topics in Social Sciences (3)

*Offered occasionally
This course may be repeated for credit when topics vary. Satisfies University core requirement in social sciences.

SOCSC 350: Senior Seminar (3)    

*Prerequisite: HIST 200 or POLSC 250 plus one 300-level course and senior standing 
*Offered only fall semesters
This course is an opportunity for students to demonstrate, refine and consolidate knowledge of skills and content acquired during their previous years of study. It is a collaborative as well as a culminating learning experience that permits students to pursue individual research projects and submit them to their peers. The seminar will center upon a topic to be determined by the instructor.

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